Policy analysis is the process of evaluating available options to achieve goals established for the public benefit by elected officials and government agency staff. The process is also used in the private sector companies and non-governmental organizations for meeting their goals. For the LENR case LENRGY’s policy analysis seeks to meet the need for inexpensive, safe, and environmentally secure sources of energy worldwide. It also pursues the goal of dealing proactively with adverse impacts of LENR as a disruptive new technology.

Evidence-Based Policymaking for Realization of LENR Benefits

Evidence-based policy making (EBP) addresses policy issues by utilizing objective evidence. Important elements of EBP are reliable data, good analytical skills, and political support for rational solutions. LENRGY utilizes EBP as an effective way to make (or revise) policies for funding LENR R&D to realize its benefits.The experimental and other evidence for LENR is overwhelming. A challenge for policymakers is to interpret this evidence in terms of policies that meet the goals for inexpensive, safe, and clean energy supplies. Click here for more information on LENRGY’s use of EBP as a superior approach to LENR policymaking. Click here for more information.

Technology Assessment for Mitigation of Adverse Secondary Impacts

Besides its potential benefits, LENR will almost certainly be a disruptive technology with major adverse secondary impacts. Prominent examples of such technologies in the past are the automobile and the Internet. Broad deployment of LENR as an energy source may be expected to have major direct impacts on all phases of the energy chain – supply, transport, storage, and consumption. Indirect impacts will be felt most by the components of society that are closely tied to the energy cycle, such as sectors of the workforce and energy-based communities.

LENRGY utilizes the effective and well-established method of technology assessment (TA) to analyze and develop mitigation strategies for LENR’s secondary impacts. TA consists of a systematic series of steps to define the types of impacts, the entities affected, the severity and timing of impacts, available measures and entities to address the effects, and development of  mitigation strategies and plans. It is an effective approach to dealing with the disruptive impacts of LENR deployment as a new source of energy. Click here for more information.

Example Policy Analysis Projects

US Government Agency Responsibilities for Emerging Energy Technologies

Many US Government agencies have energy-related missions and policymaking responsibilities. No fewer than 20 agencies address energy topics in their jurisdictions, missions, visions, strategic plans, and similar high-level guidance. Development of emerging energy technologies in particular is important to many agencies in accomplishing their objectives.

Agencies and other entities in the Legislative and Executive branches of the US Government have been investigated for LENR opportunities. The analysis found that the agencies could benefit substantially from supporting LENR to accomplish their missions. The analysis also shows that the agencies may have an obligation to pursue CF to realize its humanitarian and other benefits as well as deal proactively with anticipated adverse secondary impacts. The results were reported in a White Paper and in a presentation and paper at the 20th International Conference on Cold Fusion.

  1. Grimshaw, T.W., 2017. Emerging Energy Technologies: Responsibilities of U.S. Government Entities – Review for Potential Cold Fusion Contributions. White Paper in Support of Paper for 20th International Conference on Cold Fusion, Sendai, Japan. January. (Click here)
  2. Grimshaw, T.W., and D.J. Nagel, 2016. Responsibilities of US Government Agencies for Support of Low Energy Nuclear Reactions. Presentation at 20th International Conference on Cold Fusion, Sendai, Japan. October. (Click here)
  3. Grimshaw, T.W., and D.J. Nagel, 2016. Responsibilities of US Government Agencies for Support of Low Energy Nuclear Reactions. Paper for 20th International Conference on Cold Fusion, Sendai, Japan. December. (Click here)

Center for International Energy and Environmental Policy (CIEEP)

CIEEP is a research entity at The University of Texas at Austin where Dr. Grimshaw held the position of Research Affiliate. He directed a student internship to delineate secondary impacts of LENR, identify a methodology to address the impacts, and develop a step-by-step procedure to apply the methodology to the LENR case. Technology Assessment was selected as an effective method of dealing with direct and indirect secondary impacts of broad deployment of CF as a new source of energy. The results of this student internship were presented at ICCF-17 in Daejeon, South Korea in 2013.

  1. Leseberg, M, J. Maxwell, and T. W. Grimshaw, 2013. Public Policy Planning for Broad Deployment of Cold Fusion for Energy Production in the U.S.: Task Report 1. The Changing Landscape of Cold Fusion. February. (Click here)
  2. Leseberg, M, J. Maxwell, and T. W. Grimshaw, 2013. Public Policy Planning for Broad Deployment of Cold Fusion for Energy Production in the U.S.: Task Report 2. Technology Assessment. February. (Click here)
  3. Grimshaw, T.W, 2012. Public Policy Planning for Broad Deployment of Cold Fusion (LENR) for Energy Production. Paper FrM1-1, 17th International Conference on Cold Fusion, Daejeon, South Korea. August. (Click here)
  4. Grimshaw, T.W., 2012. Evidence-Based Public Policy for Support of Cold Fusion (LENR) Development. Poster Presented at 17th International Conference on Cold Fusion, Daejeon, South Korea. August. (Click here)
  5. Grimshaw, T.W., 2012. Public Policy Planning for Broad Deployment of Cold Fusion for Energy Production in the U.S. Supervisor, Work Plan. Student Internship at Center for International Energy & Environmental Policy, The University of Texas at Austin. May. (Click here)